Three New Inductees for U.S. Squash Hall of Fame

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The three inductees are all pioneering leaders in the game who represent historic firsts for the Hall of Fame. The one common theme is squash doubles.

Mike Pierce (third from left) stands next to Julian Illingworth (far right) in the 2014 Lapham Grant

Mike Pierce (third from left) stands next to Julian Illingworth (far right) in the 2014 Lapham Grant

Mike Pierce will be the first inductee whose primary on-court achievements come on a doubles court. One of the best left-wall players in history, Pierce won dozens of professional and amateur titles and is still the only player to ever win the U.S. national open, 40+, 50+ and 60+ tournaments. Pierce has been a significant leader off the court, as president of the Philadelphia district, builder of courts in Florida, tournament director, benefactor of urban squash and supporter of US Squash.

Gary Waite (second from left) stands next to squash writer James Zug (left) at the President's Cup celebration for the late Victor Elmaleh (center)

Gary Waite (second from left) stands next to squash writer James Zug (left) at the President’s Cup celebration for the late Victor Elmaleh (center)

If Pierce represents the 1970s and 1980s on the doubles court, Gary Waite is the symbol of doubles in the 1990s and 2000s. Like Pierce, Waite is unquestionably one of the best left-wall doubles players in history. Waite reached world No.12 in singles, but his impact on doubles in North American is immense. For fourteen years he was ranked the No.1 player on the doubles tour, winning numerous titles and often going undefeated throughout a season. In 2000 he revamped the pro doubles tour, raising its profile and initiating new events and new facilities across the continent.

Thomas Wrightson, U.S. Squash Hall of Fame 2015 inductee

Thomas Wrightson, U.S. Squash Hall of Fame 2015 inductee

Tom Wrightson is a symbol of the national breadth of squash: he will be the first Hall of Fame inductee to come from west of Cleveland. Wrightson, more than anyone else, made US Squash a national organization. He was the first US Squash president to come from the West and he presided over the first national tournament to be held in the West, the 1979 National Singles. From his home of Portland, Oregon, Wrightson served as a leader of the Pacific Coast district and a keen promoter of doubles, founding and running many tournaments.

The world’s largest and most vibrant squash hall of fame—located in historic Payne Whitney Gymnasium at Yale—the U.S. Squash Hall of Fame was founded in 2000 and is the only major hall with an actual bricks-and-mortar location. With the addition of the Class of 2015, there will be fifty-five inductees in the Hall of Fame. Read more about all past inductees on the U.S. Squash Hall of Fame page.